Red fox makes life impossible for skuas (and biologists) and divorcing royal skuas

We thought we already experienced the worst breeding season ever last year, but 2018 is even worse. While last year’s eggs survived for several days before they were eaten by the fox, this year nests are predated even before a second egg is produced. Also our activity does not seem to matter: whether we visited a nest or not, in most cases they are predated overnight. Only the nests near the lighthouse seem to stand a chance. That also limits our possibilities for retrapping loggered birds greatly. So far we retrieved 6 loggers, with only one remaining chance of retrapping a loggered bird that still has a nest. We hope that many pairs will try a second time, since it is still early in the season. Indeed, we still find new clutches from time to time, and yesterday evening we were lucky to find the nest of EG, featured in the previous blog post, with a freshly laid egg. Within ten minutes we managed to retrap her and removed her logger!

To confirm that it is really the fox taking the eggs, we placed three camera traps near skua nests. We also found out which fox den is active (a mother and two cubs) and put a camera trap near the main opening, hoping to record what prey are brought to the nests.

20180614_210023
placing a camera trap near the fox den

Apart from the fox, also the ravens are very active and might partly be responsible for the disappearing eggs. There is a nest on the walkway at the top of the lighthouse. From here, it has a perfect vantage point to oversee the area and spot incubating skuas…

Then it is time for some gossip! A much appreciated pair, with colour rings EE and SD, has been together since 2015. We named this pair after our royal family Maxima and Willem-Alexander, because EE winters in South-America and SD is the only bird in our sample that stays within Europe during winter. The sad news is… they separated! EE not only lost her logger, she also switched partners and is now together with JO in a different territory. JO is also a handsome fellow that winters off the coast of west-Africa. SD stayed in his old spot and has paired up with an ‘unknown’ (no rings) light morph female. However, both EE and SD seemed to have lost their clutches in an early stage, or did not lay at all.

DSC03868_JO_and_EE
EE (Maxima on the right) with her new partner (JO)
Advertisements

One thought on “Red fox makes life impossible for skuas (and biologists) and divorcing royal skuas

  1. Daan June 17, 2018 / 7:46 pm

    Onstuimige ontwikkelingen in het gebied Ingrid. Ik hoop dat jullie voldoende te doen hebben en hoop kunnen houden! Succes! Daan L

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s